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Blog Posts

  • A Very Social Hippo

    I have two goals for Tungsten Hippo: to increase the audience for short eBooks and to help people break free from the book-recommendation algorithms controlled by big companies and still find good things to read. I’ve taken to social media in support of these goals, and can be found on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, and Amazon (yes, even Amazon!) as well as here on my own website.

  • Content is King

    I am a techie at heart. I love making computers do what I want them to do. I also love information. I love organizing it, and finding the sometimes surprising patterns that appear.

  • Browse and You Will Find

    Searching for something isn’t always the best way to find it. This is particularly true if what you’re looking for is different things to read, since all of your search terms will probably be based on your past reading. Sometimes what you really need is a good site to browse. This is why I started Tungsten Hippo, but it is far from the only site to browse on the internet if you’re looking for short eBooks. Periodically, I’ll post links to other sites that are good for browsing for short eBooks. Here are the first three:

  • Diverse Worlds

    I mentioned in my first post that I was looking for more diverse stories to for my eReader. Roxane Gay’s article in Salon in response to David Gilmour’s unfortunate comments during a recent interview perfectly captures why I want that diversity.

  • Search Strategies

    When I first got hooked on short ebooks, I found most of the ones I read by browsing the Kindle Singles on Amazon. That method delivered a lot of great things to my Kindle, but it was clear I was missing a lot of other great things, so I started to look for other ways to find new short ebooks.

  • Time to Read

    I cannot remember a time before reading. Some of my earliest memories from school are of pulling a book out from my desk once I’d finished my seat work. As I got older, this habit eventually got me into trouble, not because my teachers minded, but because I would rush through my work to get to my book. In the sixth grade, I learned the hard way that I needed to focus on the work first. But I kept on reading. I kept reading through school, and through college.

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